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Vaughn Public Library - Ashland

A natural history of the future: what the laws of biology tell us about the destiny of the human species
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Author:
Published:
New York : Basic Books, 2021.
Format:
Book
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Desc:
vii, 306 pages; 25 cm
Status:
Description
<b>"An arresting vision of this relentless natural world"—<i>New York Times Book Review</i><br><br>A leading ecologist argues that if humankind is to survive on a fragile planet, we must understand and obey its iron laws</b><br><br>Our species has amassed unprecedented knowledge of nature, which we have tried to use to seize control of life and bend the planet to our will. In <i>A Natural History of the Future</i>, biologist Rob Dunn argues that such efforts are futile. We may see ourselves as life’s overlords, but we are instead at its mercy. In the evolution of antibiotic resistance, the power of natural selection to create biodiversity, and even the surprising life of the London Underground, Dunn finds laws of life that no human activity can annul. When we create artificial islands of crops, dump toxic waste, or build communities, we provide new materials for old laws to shape. Life’s future flourishing is not in question. Ours is.<br><br>As ambitious as Edward Wilson’s <i>Sociobiology</i> and as timely as Elizabeth Kolbert’s <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, <i>A Natural History of the Future</i> sets a new standard for understanding the diversity and destiny of life itself.
Also in This Series
Copies
Location
Call Number
Status
Ashland Adult Nonfiction
304.2 DUN
Due Feb 10, 2022
Location
Call Number
Status
Lac Courte Oreilles Adult Nonfiction
304.2 DUNN
Due Jan 31, 2022
More Like This
More Details
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781541619302

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description
"Biologist Rob Dun grew up listening to stories of the Mississippi River, how it flooded his grandfather's town of Greenville, swallowing up the townsfolk and leaving behind a muddy wasteland. Years later, Dunn discovered the cause of the great deluge. The Army Corps of Engineers had tried to straighten the river, cutting off its meandering oxbows in order to allow for the easy passage of boats. They had tried to bend nature to their own design. But as Dunn argues in A Natural History of the Future, nature has its own set of rules, and no amount of human tampering can rewrite them. We might think that we can meet the challenges of global warming by manipulating nature with our technology--and even that we can live without non-human life--but as Dunn shows, we can't. We not only rely on the natural world for food, but we need its microbes to carry out the most basic bodily functions. The rules of life, Dunn explains, are all-encompassing, governing where species are likely to abound, the inevitable arms race between humans and our predators, and even our own ignorance about nature. Collectively, these rules shed light on the future of life and our destiny, revealing where our visions for cities, roads, schools, and society at large run afoul of nature's inescapable dictates. The future we have been planning is one in which we try to hold back life. As Dunn argues, we cannot: Surviving or reversing climate change and other ecological catastrophes isn't just a question of reducing our carbon footprint with clean technologies or protecting ecosystems. It's not about "fixes." It's about working with nature, and so learning to live by the rules that entails. Drawing on topics as diverse as how microbes acquired during birth affect our health and what species might inhabit the crust of the Earth, Dunn reveals the surprising complexities of the natural world and the interconnectedness of life itself. Along the way, he offers plenty of simple lessons in how we can, individually and collectively, through environmental policy, make the lifestyle changes necessary to ensure our own species' survival. At once hopeful and practical, A Natural History of the Future offers a vision of our future in which humans and the natural world coexist symbiotically"--,Provided by publisher.
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Dunn, R. (2021). A natural history of the future: what the laws of biology tell us about the destiny of the human species. First edition. New York: Basic Books.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Dunn, Rob. 2021. A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us About the Destiny of the Human Species. New York: Basic Books.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Dunn, Rob, A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us About the Destiny of the Human Species. New York: Basic Books, 2021.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Dunn, Rob. A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us About the Destiny of the Human Species. First edition. New York: Basic Books, 2021. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
f8493239-0cf5-90e6-4b86-9fd505eb3fa6
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Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeJan 20, 2022 02:03:17 PM
Last File Modification TimeJan 20, 2022 02:03:21 PM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeJan 20, 2022 02:03:21 PM

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