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Vaughn Public Library - Ashland

The sinner and the saint: Dostoevsky and the gentleman murderer who inspired a masterpiece
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Published:
New York : Penguin Press, 2021.
Format:
Book
Physical Desc:
416 pages, 8 unnumbered leaves of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
Status:
Description
<b><b>*A<i> New York Times</i> <i>Book Review</i> Editors' Choice * One of <i>The East Hampton Star</i>'s 10 Best Books of the Year*<br><br>From the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>The Most Dangerous Book</i>, the true story behind the creation of another masterpiece of world literature, Fyodor Dostoevsky's <i>Crime and Punishment</i>.</b></b><br><br><i>The Sinner and the Saint </i>is the deeply researched and immersive tale of how Dostoevsky came to write this great murder story—and why it changed the world. As a young man, Dostoevsky was a celebrated writer, but his involvement with the radical politics of his day condemned him to a long Siberian exile. There, he spent years studying the criminals that were his companions. Upon his return to St. Petersburg in the 1860s, he fought his way through gambling addiction, debilitating debt, epilepsy, the deaths of those closest to him, and literary banishment to craft an enduring classic. <br> <br>The germ of <i>Crime and Punishment</i> came from the sensational story of Pierre François Lacenaire, a notorious murderer who charmed and outraged Paris in the 1830s. Lacenaire was a glamorous egoist who embodied the instincts that lie beneath nihilism, a western-influenced philosophy inspiring a new generation of Russian revolutionaries. Dostoevsky began creating a Russian incarnation of Lacenaire, a character who could demonstrate the errors of radical politics and ideas. His name would be Raskolnikov.<br> <br>Lacenaire shaped Raskolnikov in profound ways, but the deeper insight, as Birmingham shows, is that Raskolnikov began to merge with Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky was determined to tell a murder story from the murderer's perspective, but his character couldn't be a monster. No. The murderer would be chilling because he wants so desperately to be good.<br> <br>The writing consumed Dostoevsky. As his debts and the predatory terms of his contract caught up with him, he hired a stenographer to dictate the final chapters in time. Anna Grigorievna became Dostoevsky's first reader and chief critic and changed the way he wrote forever. By the time Dostoevsky finished his great novel, he had fallen in love.<br> <br>Dostoevsky's great subject was self-consciousness. <i>Crime and Punishment </i>advanced a revolution in artistic thinking and began the greatest phase of Dostoevsky's career. <i>The Sinner and the Saint</i> now gives us the thrilling and definitive story of that triumph.
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Status
Last Check-In
Ashland Adult Nonfiction
891.733 BIR
Due Jan 24, 2022
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Language:
English
ISBN:
9781594206306, 1594206309

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 362-397) and index.
Description
"From the New York Times bestselling author of The Most Dangerous Book, the true story behind the creation of another masterpiece of world literature, Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. The Sinner and The Saint is the deeply researched and immersive tale of how Dostoevsky came to write this great murder story-and why it changed the world. As a young man, Dostoevsky was a celebrated writer, but his involvement with the radical politics of his day condemned him to a long Siberian exile. There, he spent years studying the criminals that were his companions. Upon his return to St. Petersburg in the 1860s, he fought his way through gambling addiction, debilitating debt, epilepsy, the deaths of those closest to him, and literary banishment to craft an enduring classic. The germ of Crime and Punishment came from the sensational story of Pierre François Lacenaire, a notorious murderer who charmed and outraged Paris in the 1830s. Lacenaire was a glamorous egoist who embodied the instincts that lie beneath nihilism, a western-influenced philosophy inspiring a new generation of Russian revolutionaries. Dostoevsky began creating a Russian incarnation of Lacenaire, a character who could demonstrate the errors of radical politics and ideas. His name would be Raskolnikov. Lacenaire shaped Raskolnikov in profound ways, but the deeper insight, as Birmingham shows, is that Raskolnikov began to merge with Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky was determined to tell a murder story from the murderer's perspective, but his character couldn't be a monster. No. The murderer would be chilling because he wants so desperately to be good. The writing consumed Dostoevsky. As his debts and the predatory terms of his contract caught up with him, he hired a stenographer to dictate the final chapters in time. Anna Grigorievna became Dostoevsky's first reader and chief critic and changed the way he wrote forever. By the time Dostoevsky finished his great novel, he had fallen in love. Dostoevsky's great subject was self-consciousness. Crime and Punishment advanced a revolution in artistic thinking and began the greatest phase of Dostoevsky's career. The Sinner and The Saint now gives us the thrilling and definitive story of that triumph"--,Provided by publisher.
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Birmingham, K. (2021). The sinner and the saint: Dostoevsky and the gentleman murderer who inspired a masterpiece. New York: Penguin Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Birmingham, Kevin. 2021. The Sinner and the Saint: Dostoevsky and the Gentleman Murderer Who Inspired a Masterpiece. New York: Penguin Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Birmingham, Kevin, The Sinner and the Saint: Dostoevsky and the Gentleman Murderer Who Inspired a Masterpiece. New York: Penguin Press, 2021.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Birmingham, Kevin. The Sinner and the Saint: Dostoevsky and the Gentleman Murderer Who Inspired a Masterpiece. New York: Penguin Press, 2021. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
73167251-2ae1-ab9d-dd1b-27ebb3fa4612
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Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeJan 10, 2022 11:08:04 AM
Last File Modification TimeJan 10, 2022 11:10:07 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeJan 10, 2022 11:08:11 AM

MARC Record

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5050 |a The dead leaves -- The devil's streetlamps -- Sharp claws -- Némésis -- The Petrashevsky circle -- The execution -- Exile -- The social contract -- The dead man -- Aunt Razor -- The resurrection -- Ferrocious materialism -- The birth of nihilism -- A gambling system -- An evil spirit -- An ax -- Headsmen and victims -- Diseased imagination -- The investigator -- Double-edged evidence -- Little dove -- Tiny diamond -- Buried in furs -- The wedding.
520 |a "From the New York Times bestselling author of The Most Dangerous Book, the true story behind the creation of another masterpiece of world literature, Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. The Sinner and The Saint is the deeply researched and immersive tale of how Dostoevsky came to write this great murder story-and why it changed the world. As a young man, Dostoevsky was a celebrated writer, but his involvement with the radical politics of his day condemned him to a long Siberian exile. There, he spent years studying the criminals that were his companions. Upon his return to St. Petersburg in the 1860s, he fought his way through gambling addiction, debilitating debt, epilepsy, the deaths of those closest to him, and literary banishment to craft an enduring classic. The germ of Crime and Punishment came from the sensational story of Pierre François Lacenaire, a notorious murderer who charmed and outraged Paris in the 1830s. Lacenaire was a glamorous egoist who embodied the instincts that lie beneath nihilism, a western-influenced philosophy inspiring a new generation of Russian revolutionaries. Dostoevsky began creating a Russian incarnation of Lacenaire, a character who could demonstrate the errors of radical politics and ideas. His name would be Raskolnikov. Lacenaire shaped Raskolnikov in profound ways, but the deeper insight, as Birmingham shows, is that Raskolnikov began to merge with Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky was determined to tell a murder story from the murderer's perspective, but his character couldn't be a monster. No. The murderer would be chilling because he wants so desperately to be good. The writing consumed Dostoevsky. As his debts and the predatory terms of his contract caught up with him, he hired a stenographer to dictate the final chapters in time. Anna Grigorievna became Dostoevsky's first reader and chief critic and changed the way he wrote forever. By the time Dostoevsky finished his great novel, he had fallen in love. Dostoevsky's great subject was self-consciousness. Crime and Punishment advanced a revolution in artistic thinking and began the greatest phase of Dostoevsky's career. The Sinner and The Saint now gives us the thrilling and definitive story of that triumph"--|c Provided by publisher.
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